Potter’s House has its roots in walking alongside disadvantaged individuals and families living among rubbish dump sites and in rural communities. They empower the poor to make significant changes in their own lives and their own communities.

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Guatemala City

Over 13,000 people live next to the biggest landfill site in Central America. 7,000 of these are children. Thousands of people resort to scavenging on the dump, desperate to find something of value to sell to support their families.

Our ministry partner, Potter’s House, serves these communities living and scavenging on the dump. They run their ministry from three community centres in the area which have become safe havens where children, individuals and families are developed through holistic programmes underpinned by the Christian faith. Lasting change comes when communities are empowered to make changes for their own growth and these programmes aim to do that by focusing on the spiritual, mental, and physical growth of individuals.

Chiquimula

In late 2017, Potter’s House, following a strategic review of its activities, began to expand its work to other areas of Guatemala. One of the aims of this expansion was to use the learning from the Guatemala City work over many years and apply in other areas of Guatemala. Potter’s House has recently established a community centre in Chiquimula.

Western Highlands

During 2019 Potter’s House began building relationships with authorities and communities in the Western Region. This allowed a number of small pilot projects to take place in Quetzaltenango, Totonicapán and San Marcos. Over 2019, nearly 5,000 treasures were reached, nearly double the goal for the first year.

Covid-19 Emergency Response

Covid-19 response became an unexpected but far-reaching programme during 2020 and will continue as long as the virus is active in the communities that Potter’s House serves. The programme covers three areas: Food Security, Health, Hygiene & Sanitation and Resilience & Recovery.  Over spring-summer 2020, food security and combatting hunger was a major focus.

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Programmes include…

ChildAid

To find out about sponsoring a child supported by Potter’s House, visit their ChildAid page.

Family Development

Providing spiritual guidance for the families, focussing on reconnecting the family as a unit by helping them learn to support each other. Teaching them how to effectively communicate with each other.

Education

Holistically equipping and shaping the lives of the children from elementary school through to university. Teaching them academic subjects and Christian values and principles. 70% of Potters House staff came from this programme.

Health and Nutrition

Providing medical attention, treating illnesses and educating in the basics of disease prevention and personal hygiene. Children are provided with nutritious meals that help them to reach the national group average for their height and weight.

Micro-enterprise

Providing financial resources and guidance to enable people in the community to start or grow a small business and increase their income. This in turn improves their lives and the lives of their family. The scheme includes educating people on the importance of saving money and awareness of loan sharks.

Community Development

Promoting community participation and collaboration for community projects such as infrastructure, evangelising and supporting self-management. Training new leaders to develop their communities.

Potter’s House 2020 impact…

  • 32,829

    People heard the Gospel

  • 30,000

    Children educated

  • 1,966

    People received medical care

  • 2,600

    Food/relief parcels distributed

About Guatemala

Guatemala has been suffering the consequences of a 36-year civil war that killed hundreds of thousands and left the country with huge social, economic and spiritual problems. This has led to high levels of organised crime, gang violence, severe rural poverty, drugs trafficking, violence against women, infant mortality and malnourishment. Hundreds of families, including 7,000 children make up the communities that live adjacent to Guatemala City’s vast refuse tip.